Dress Code Legislation (DEECD)

Purpose of this policy

To outline the legislative basis for student dress codes.

Policy

All school councils have the authority to develop and implement dress codes for their students with this authority arising from a Ministerial Order under the Education and Training Reform Act 2006.

Legislative basis

This table describes the legislative basis for dress codes.

Act, regulation or order

Description

Ministerial Order under the Education and Training Reform Act 2006 Authorises the school council to develop and implement a dress code that covers any matters which a school council considers appropriate in relation to:

  • clothing and other items worn, carried or used
  • grooming
  • physical appearance and the general presentation of students.

 

Section 16(1)(c) – Education and Training Regulations 2007  

States that the principal of a government school may determine the consequences to be imposed on a student for not wearing the school uniform in accordance with any determination of the school council on school uniforms, but the principal must be satisfied that the student’s failure to wear the uniform was because of the student’s disobedience, that the consequences must be reasonable and that the dress code policy has been brought to the attention of the students and parents. 

 

Section 16(1)(c) – Education and Training Regulations 2007  

States that an educational authority may set and enforce reasonable standards of dress and appearance for students, where a standard of dress and appearance for students is considered reasonable when the views of the school community have been taken into account in setting the standard.

 

Jamie’s Story – Year 7 Transitions Camp

The 2011 Year 7 Transitions Camp to Golden Valley Lodge in Flinders, Victoria is, and will continue to be, one of my favourite memories of Gleneagles. I went to the camp barely knowing anyone but by the time we got home I knew a lot of people, many of whom had become my friends. All the activities were fun to do and be a part of. I conquered my fear of heights and free-falling on the giant swing and the Flying Fox, a zip line which runs down the side of a mountain. I had so much fun at the camp I asked the teachers if I could stay longer because I didn’t want to leave, but unfortunately, it was time to go. I now have a group of friends who I love and trust and know they will be my life-long friends. The beginning of my Gleneagles journey started with a good memory.

Translate »